© Thorben Mehrhoff

Stroll over sunken bridges.

A unique experience: walking on the lake bed, because when the water is low, submerged bridges and villages reappear.

Edersee Atlantis

The Eder Dam was built over 100 years ago to ensure the water supply to the Weser and the Mittelland Canal in the summer months. The villages of Asel, Berich and Bringhausen had to be moved and rebuilt at higher locations. Even today, when the water level of the Edersee is low, you can marvel at the remains of the old villages and hike across the lake bed.

When the 4-arched Aseler Bridge gradually becomes visible again, it is very impressive, also because it is the best-preserved structure. You can even walk over them. It's hard to believe that it's been under water for months and it's somehow fascinating when you stand there and imagine that there would be almost 10 meters of water over you when it was completely full.

A journey back in time.

Where houses once stood and people lived, there is now one of the largest reservoirs in Europe. You can see the water level at which the old ruins appear here:

Asel Bridge

Before the barrier wall was built, there were 175 residents and 30 farms here. A small part of the population settled in what is now Asel-Süd, while others found a new home in Vöhl and the surrounding more agriculturally productive areas. The well-known 4-arched Eder Bridge is the best-preserved structure in the old Eder Valley and rises from a water level of 235,10 m above sea level. NN again.

© Photo archive of the Hesse State Office for Monument Preservation
Small village and the Edersee in the foreground.

Alt Bringhausen

Bringhausen was at the foot of the castle hill, which is now known as Love Island and can still be seen. Only a few remains of Bring Castle, from which Bringhausen owes its name, remain, which appear when the water on the Edersee is low. The church in Bringhausen was demolished before the flooding and rebuilt in a reduced size in Neu-Bringhausen. The graves of the old cemetery were covered with stone slabs and are submerged at a water level of 231,75 m above sea level. NN again.

© Carola Finke
Atlantis village from back then.

Village office area

About 3 kilometers from Waldeck Castle was the village of Berich on a narrow mountain edge. Before the dam was built, 134 people lived here, all of whom were resettled in Neu-Berich (near Bad-Arolsen), including the church. The graves in the Berich cemetery were covered with stone slabs. The burial ground is constructed from a water level of 231,00 m above sea level. NN visible. Remains of the Eder Bridge, which was only built in 1899, appear from a water level of 216,95 m above sea level. NN.

Stollmühle and houses around it.

Hopfenberg and Stollmühle

The Stollmühle used to stand on the Hopfenberg, and it already looked neglected when the barrier wall was built. In 1756 two prisoners completed a 75 m long tunnel to operate a hammer mill nearby. This meant that the mill had constant and very special water power. The Hopfenberg is built from a water level of 241,30 m above sea level. NN visible. It is completely visible from a water level of 230,20 m above sea level. NN and the Stollmühle from a water level of approx. 214,00 m above sea level. NN.

Bringhauser Bridge

The bridge once connected Bringhausen and Nieder-Werbe. When the water level is low you can see parts of the Eder Bridge, built in 1897. The Bringhäuser Bridge is built from a water level of 225,00 m above sea level. NN visible.

Reporter Hut

At the entrance to Werber Bay there was the Bericher Hütte and a dairy. The hut was abandoned in 1875 and was already in ruins when the dam wall was built. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the iron ore mined near Adorf was brought to the Bericher Hütte and further processed there. Up to 10 wagonloads per day were transported over the Waldecker Berg near Korbach to the hammer and ironworks. Remains of the buildings are at a water level of 223,00 m above sea level. NN to see.

© Helge Franz
Edersee Atlantis barrier wall model as an exhibition.

Barrier wall model

Before the actual barrier wall was built, a 1:40 scale model was built at the Bericher Hütte. The various devices for draining the water were tested on this model. For this purpose, water was taken from the old mill ditch of the former hut. The dam model still reappears today when the water level is low and is still very well preserved. The dam model is built from a water level of 221,05 m above sea level. NN visible.

© Photo archive of the Hesse State Office for Monument Preservation
Ruins that emerge when the water level is low.

Good Vornhagen

The Vornhagen estate was located at the foot of the Schlossberg. It belonged to the village of Berich, 500 meters away. Vornhagen was formerly an independent dairy farm, but was later leased to the Waldeck domain. Below the Stollmühle there was formerly the Vornhagener Hammer, which was in operation until 1819. The walls of Gut Vornhagen are built at a water level of 218,90 m above sea level. NN visible.

© Evgeni Tcherkasski

Fascinating and mysterious: The Aseler Bridge at night!

The history:

The Eder Dam, which is over 100 years old, was built between 1908 and 1914 and was primarily intended to be used to supply water to the Weser and the Mittelland Canal in the summer months. In addition, the barrier wall is still used today to generate electricity and protect against flooding. A total of 300.000 cubic meters of quarry stone were used to build the wall and over 7,5 million gold marks were paid. But the construction also had a negative side - many people had to leave their homes. The former villages of Asel, Berich and Bringhausen as well as three farms were completely abandoned, affecting around 900 people. Other neighboring towns, such as Herzhausen and Niederwerbe, also lost some of their fields, farms or districts. Residents were compensated to build new livelihoods and relocated to higher ground or existing communities. When the water level is low, parts of the old villages reappear, such as the Eder bridge in Asel, the old village in Berich or the barrier wall model.

“Myth Edersee”

An exciting, animated journey through time

“Mythos Edersee” is a new way of telling stories and invites you to immerse yourself in a journey through time in the basement of the Edersee Visitor Center. Historical, sometimes animated, images and video sequences from the imperial era to the present are projected onto the walls.

Feel free to take half an hour to walk around the room and become part of the story. Active participation is desired in this new type of exhibition, because a different detail can be seen in every corner. Enjoy the moment when innovative storytelling, a wide range of sensory impressions and modern technology are combined to create an unforgettable experience.

The foundations of Berich

Experience Edersee-Atlantis up close.

When the water level is low, you can hike through the dry lake bed and follow in the footsteps of Edersee-Atlantis and at the same time enter a mysterious world.

Tip: The Edersee Atlantis app!
With the help of the augmented reality function, you can make Alt-Berich appear again and experience how some of the old buildings are being built up again in detail before your eyes.
    

Good Vornhagen

Waldeck

© Emde (Korbach), Hesse State Office for Monument Preservation, Monument Preservation Department, Marburg branch

Alt-Berich village site

Vohl

© unknown, “The town of Berich with the monastery church, 1912”, in: Historical image documents (as of October 11.10.2012, XNUMX)

Alt-Bringhausen village

Edertal

© unknown, photo archive of the Hesse State Office for Monument Preservation

Reporter Hut

Waldeck

© Sven Bökenschmidt, Edersee | Your region: wild, colorful, healthy.

Asel Bridge

Vohl

© Heinrich Kowalski, Edersee | Your region: wild, colourful, healthy.

Barrier wall model

Waldeck

© CC-BY-ND | Helge Franz, Edersee | Your region: wild, colorful, healthy.

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